# A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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#9 Regular
3.875" x 8.875" Envelope
#10 Regular
4.125" x 9.5" Envelope
#10 Window
4.125" x 9.5" Envelope, left side window

A

B

Back Gum
Applied to the permanently closed seams; quick drying.
Baronial Envelope:
A style of envelope that has a large pointed seal flap. This style envelope is usually close to being square; however, the flap and paper used are the most distinguishing features. The most common present usage is for greeting cards or social stationary. The name 'Baronial' is derived from "baron" which signifies a high social standing.
Business Reply or Return Envelope:
These two envelopes can be any style or size. The distinct difference between them is "who pays the postage?" A Business Reply is referred to as the envelope that has a pre-printed First-Class Permit and return address on it and the original sender pays for its return. The Business Return has a pre-printed return address but the individual returning the envelope must apply postage. The most commonly used envelopes for either purpose are the the commercial style 6.25", 6.75" or 9". Another frequently used-style is the remittance flap (Collection) style. A Hitch-Hiker envelope that can serve as both the mailing and return envelope is also available.

C

Catalog Envelopes:
All envelopes with the "open end" flap are called catalog.
Center Seam:
Is the permanent seam that is located approximately in the center of the envelope running from the bottom fold and seam up through the envelope and terminates at the throat.
Commercial Style Envelopes:
These are the most common business style envelopes. They are "open side" of diagonal or side seam construction. Applies to a wide range of sizes from 6.25" through 14"...both regulars and window envelopes.
Counted Down:
A term applied to envelopes when their flaps are folded down against the back of the envelope. Most envelopes are packed in boxes in this fashion. It is opposed to flaps extended.
Cut Out Envelopes:
The term applied to an envelope having a panel or panels cut out of the face or back or both, and not having a covering over the panels.

D

Diagonal Seam:
A seam running diagonally from the bottom fold and corner upward toward the throat of the envelope.
Direct Thermal:
In a direct thermal system, the heat of the printhead causes a chemical reaction on specially-coated label paper, resulting in a black image on a label. The advantage of this process is that it does not require the extra step of installing a ribbon. There are many grades of direct thermal materials. When direct thermal labels first came out, there were only two types of direct thermal materials; uncoated and coated. Uncoated materials tend to have a shorter usable readability making them "short-term" labels. They range from uncoated economy to topcoated scuff resistant. When deciding whether direct thermal is right for a specific label application, it is important to understand the environment as well as the durability of the printed image on the label that is required. Infrared materials produce a darker image due to the wider spectrum of color it includes. Although most direct thermal label materials cost more, the end-to-end cost may be less due to the time and hassle saved by not having to change ribbons on thermal transfer labels.

E

F

Flaps Extended:
This term is used to describe a condition of leaving the envelope seal flaps in a vertical position (not folded down).
Flaps Folded Down:
A term supplied to envelopes when their flaps are folded down against the back of the envelope. Most envelopes are packed in boxes in this fashion. It is opposed to flaps extended.

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L

Latex Seal:
It is a self-sealing adhesive that requires NO moisture. Two gum surfaces are required to create a bond when they are brought together.

M

N

O

Open End Envelopes:
A style of envelope on which the opening is on the shorter side.
Open Side Envelopes:
A style of envelope on which the opening is on the longer side. All commercials are open side.

P

Peel & Seel:
Self adhering seal flap adhesive with a protective strip. No moistening agent required. In addition, there is a wide selection of closures, including clasp, string and button.

Q

R

Regular Envelopes:
A style of Commercial, Official or Bankers Flap envelope which does NOT have a window panel cut in it..
Remittance Envelopes:
A large style seal flap of approximately the same size and shape of the envelope itself.

S

Seal Gum:
There are two types: Both are used on the seal flaps of the envelopes. RE-MOISTENING type which requires moisture to achieve a seal. NON-RE-MOISTENING type which requires two surfaces of gum and no water to achieve a seal.
Side Seam Over:
The term applied to the side seam when it folds UNDER the back flap of an envelope.
Spot-Lite Envlopes:
Any style envelope having a panel or panels cut out of its face and/or back which permits viewing a portion of the contents. These panels may or may not be covered. Spot-Lites are sometimes known as windows, outlooks or cutouts.
Square Flap:
A style of flap with straight edges and rectangular corners. These are used on A-Style envelopes and square envelopes.

T

Top-Coat:
A coating that protects the printing and the surface of a pressure sensitive label from abrasion, sunlight, chemicals, moisture or any combination of these. Varnish and lacquers are examples of Top-Coats.

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V

W

Wallet Flap:
A large style seal flap of approximately the same size and shape of the envelope itself.

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